My mission statement

SalieDavis

Throughout my varied careers and experiences is a thread of commonality, the desire to see others achieve their goals. This desire has manifested itself in my pursuit of leadership and teaching opportunities in my careers, personal pursuits, and in volunteer work. Removing barriers such as the limits poverty and distance have on individuals is a focus of mine as these are personal barriers I have faced. Technology and distance learning as well as virtual employment have been beneficial in this. I myself have achieved my education only do to the availability of distance education. In addition, my virtual employment has overcome the barrier of limited local resources in employment.

Through self-reflection and analysis of my experiences key words that express my personal goals, how I wish to impact others are: to uplift and inspire, broaden horizons, deepen understanding, enlighten, strengthen and support, inform, increase awareness, protect human dignity, share beauty and joy, challenge people to think – to examine their beliefs and the effect these have on themselves and others, and to minister on a spiritual level of truth. This is likely why my future goals fall into a desire to teach and to express myself in creative fields through technology.

Words of wisdom from a virtual student and a virtual employee.

For those who do not know me I have been isolated by poverty and distance since childhood. Technology has freed me from those bounds. I have been a virtual student since 2001 and have been a virtual employee for almost as long. I am forever surprised at the fear of technology that exists in our schools and in our professions. I worked for five years as a teacher and was daily faced with having to defend technology and argue its value and importance. Even as a Masters student I am still shocked at how slow educators and professionals are to accept technology due to misconceptions and fear. So here are my thoughts on the benefit of hybrid meetings using technology to facilitate networking and engagement.

While students and employees continue to benefit from face to face networking in a function room, new technologies are increasingly advancing with the ability to draw in participants who would otherwise be isolated. New technologies, not subject to physical boundaries are becoming increasingly more accessible.

This can be accomplished through personal mobile devices or virtual meeting environments, technology is the key to expanding outreach and the way content is communicated, both in conjunction with and separate from face to face communication. Not only are people who are limited by distance or other boundaries drawn into the discussion where they would otherwise be excluded, but those within the physical environment have access to a more engaged degree of interaction.

Overcoming fear of new technologies as taboo has always been a challenge. From the onset of telephonic conferences, rejected as impersonal, to video conferences rejected as intrusive, the taboo of having any electronic device in a classroom or meeting, all these taboos have been overcome and can now be looked back upon as the fear of change that slowed networking progress. 3D environments is the current taboo that professionals face in all fields that require networking and collaboration.

Mobile technology and social media are the current most active trends. 3D environments are quickly catching on, from virtual worlds to the development of walk in 3D web pages. The use of 3D environments are proving to increase engagement with the ability to learn and collaborate in meeting spaces. It is becoming common place to see layered meetings, even with face to face interaction, combined with distance communication and participants, live streaming, recording, gamification within the presentations, and multiple levels of interaction with links, slide shows, and even independent exploration of all of these options inside virtual environments.

Virtual meeting technology is efficient and cost effective. It eliminates travel, saves time, reduces expenditures, and increases convenience for the participant. It is also more environmentally friendly and quickly being adopted in the business fields, even as an alternative to the brick and mortar work space for all of the reasons mentioned above.

Companies have virtual employees using adobe rooms, Skype, Zoom, messenger, virtual networks and remote desktops because it is cost effective and convenient on a global scale. Colleges are needing to help students embrace virtual technology not only as a social and educational venue, but in career preparation in order to encourage future success.

Hybrid or blended meetings are the bridge for those still uncertain when it comes to improvements that require open mindedness towards newer technologies. Hybrid meetings have real time face to face components as well as virtual components, such as live streaming a conference or meeting with a group to experience a 3D immersive tour and discussion. Back channel conversations on social media, twitter, Facebook, or even meeting platforms such as Zoom, can work in conjunction with live events or live virtual immersive events.

Virtual meetings and immersive environments will never replace face to face interaction but they can greatly enhance them. We are social beings and physical proximity will always be a major aspect of networking and engagement. Emerging technologies merely enhance the experience and remove the boundaries that prevent many from participating. Those individuals who would otherwise feel isolated due to financial, physical, distance or other challenges, through blended environments are able to contribute and collaborate. The exploration of these interactive and immersive formats challenge us to become more relevant and more engaging. What a great opportunity to continue developing relationships that may start at a college or business event and be able to be nurtured and continued through the use of virtual and immersive technology.

Creation of a picture book lesson plan with; PDF format, power point, spreadsheet, and word document resources, as well as three video resources.

The above video gives an overview for teachers and parents

This is the story book read by the author for younger children

This is just the pages to be paused and read individually

Gods little story book about art creation teachers edition in PowerPoint 

You may adapt the PowerPoint for your own use but may not distribute any adapted information without written  consent from the author and you must give proper credit to the author

final project creation picture book lesson plan word document Salie Davis

You may adapt the document for your own use but may not distribute any adapted information without written  consent from the author and you must give proper credit to the author

gods little story book about art creation student edition in PDF

You may adapt the PDF for your own use but may not distribute any adapted information without written  consent from the author and you must give proper credit to the author

Gods little story book about art creation student edition in PowerPoint

You may adapt the PowerPoint for your own use but may not distribute any adapted information without written  consent from the author and you must give proper credit to the author

Gods little story book about art creation teachers edition in PDFfinal-project-creation-picture-book-lesson-plan-salie-davis

You may adapt the PDF for your own use but may not distribute any adapted information without written  consent from the author and you must give proper credit to the author

grading sheet for the picture book in spreadsheet format

You may adapt the grading sheet for your own use but may not distribute any adapted information without written  consent from the author and you must give proper credit to the author

Literacy Guide

INTRODUCTION TO LITERACY:

Transliteracy overcomes the debate around traditional literacy versus digital literacy to include all communication types. “Several competing concepts of literacy have emerged including digital literacy, media literacy, visual literacy, and information technology fluency, but there is a need for a comprehensive framework based on essential information proficiencies and knowledge. New media literacy and transliteracy have also responded to the rapid and ongoing changes in technology. As part of a metaliteracy reframing, we argue that producing and sharing information are critical activities in participatory Web 2.0 environments” ( Mackey and Jacobson, P. 1) Whether you use the terms transliteracy, information literacy, media literacy, digital literacy, or metaliteracy; the terminology seems burgeoning but the concepts are the same. We need to be a literate society in whatever communication device we are using.  One thing that has changed in our culture is that in education it is no long “answer the question” it is now “question the answer”!  The challenge exists now for educators on what forms of literacy to focus on in order for students to know how to use the tools in order to aquire the knowledge they need for any specified subject. Literacy is not about just reading and writing anymore. Listed below are important literacies for middle school students.

TRADITIONAL LITERACY:

Traditional Literacy is reading and writing.  By middle school this is a case by case issue, however reading and writing in the digital age is less centered on paper bound books or pencil/pen and paper.

INFORMATION LITERACY:

Typing and Text Creation

Being able to type proficiently on a keyboard is essential. Even keyboards however are becoming outdated. Students should also be aware of touch screens, and know how to access various digital menus in order to navigate different forms of text production in the digital age. Document creation in various formats and with various programs will be needed. Examples of this are the difference between using notes programs and document programs regarding formatting options. The basics of formatting and saving a document are sufficient at this level.

Visual and Audial Creation

Being able to create presentations using audio and visual applications are important. This may be as simple as using a devices microphone to create an audio file, slide presentation programs or webcams for videos.

Tool Literacy

One example of tools is the calculator. Calculators come in many forms in our digital culture and are more often found on computer screens, tablet screens and phones. Unless students are in an educational or business setting hand held devices dedicated solely to calculations are not used.  A basic understanding of spreadsheet operations, gathering and measuring data, graphs, charts, and formulas for creating graphing visuals is also important. Beyond just saving information in files on a computer, students must be able to know how to capture information that is not downloadable. An example of this is a snipping tool, or screen capture video program. Because tools are always changing I won’t try to create an all-inclusive list here.

Accessing Digital Data

Effective search methods on digital devices will need to be taught. This not only includes how to access text online or on devices, or web pages, but also visual and audio access. Students need to know how to access, podcasts, informational videos, and how to navigate them on various devices.

Navigation

Knowing how to access and navigate EBooks, educational websites, online libraries and databases will be important for students when reading and researching text in the digital age. Adaptions for audio presentation, enlarging text on the screen and other accessibility options is also beneficial to address.

Evaluating digital data

Evaluation of websites and digital information is crucial for students to determine the difference between factual information, scientific theory, opinion, propaganda, and falsehood.

Citing Sources and understanding copyright

Knowing where to find citation information and accepted forms for citation is helpful for students in the evaluation of material, and presentation of research. Understanding copyrights and creative commons is beneficial well collecting, presenting and sharing digital data.

Collaboration

Collaboration tools like online documents, chat boards, video or telephonic conferencing, mind maps and other cooperative tools can be introduced with the benefits of education and future work or interest collaboration as examples.

Safety Online

Being able to identify and protect one’s self against phishing activities, bulling, and information theft and privacy issues online is essential.

Netiquette

Online communication rules and cultural norms for politeness and appropriate behavior should be taught and enforced.

Culture: Media Convergence and Networked Participation

Culture: Media Convergence and Networked Participation

Salie Davis

I have a particular interest in open source and creative commons licensing. The book, Culture: Media Convergence and Networked Participation talks about the term “Publics” as being a shared culture. This culture operates outside of economics. The current capitalistic culture, once based on rewards and economic gain through contribution and hard work, has disintegrated from a three class step society, two a two class have and have nots of varying degrees.  With the increased technology making participation more accessible, the lower classes struggle against economic barriers by attempting to educate and assist the common culture through these technologies.  “Publics can be reactors, (re)makers and (re)distributors, engaging in shared culture and knowledge through discourse and social exchange as well as through acts of media reception” (Varnelis, 2012, Pg. 3) This works in today’s culture due to the ability to pool from a larger geography of participants.

With technology advancement, much like the evolution of the printing press and eventual media industry, Governments and top level economic status, work to create structural barriers to limit the commons exchange of thoughts and ideas in order to maintain control over the populations. One example of this is the limit on cross border internet communications. This is not only through country barriers but even region barriers within countries. For example the United States has the New England region and the South Eastern, etc.  This means when shopping online the individual is limited to options by region which essentially limits the individuals’ choices.

According to the text however, “Yochai Benkler sees these decentralized networks of communication and exchange as major catalysts of the shift to a networked information economy that is displacing the industrial information economy” (Varnelis, 2012, Pg. 8) This proposal suggests that nonmarket devices will increase through the advancement of media convergence and networked participation. Michael Bauwens also theorizes that human network- based organization may result in individuals “…engaged in the production of common resources, without recourse to monetary compensation as key motivating factor, and not organized according to hierarchical methods of command and control” (Varnelis, 2012, Pg. 8). This is explained as the networked information economy of which the costs for producing creative applications can be shared over the public space between like-minded participants who can forgo the price system in order to creatively combine their interests to create projects. This results in “…nonmarket sector of information, knowledge, and cultural production…” (Varnelis, 2012, Pg. 8).

This book does well to incorporate several different possible theories of future change based on the increase of networked participation such as the theories of Bauwens who describes this network as a person to person (P2P) interaction increasing significant social, economic and political exchanges between individuals that would not normally take place. In the same text it is also pointed out that human nature seeks like minds, therefor there is a debate that exists as to whether this P2P interaction truly initiates change or whether it just reinforces currently held beliefs through the increased access to assemble with like minds.

Varnelis keeps the discussion well rounded through the analysis of several different opinions such as Garret Hardin’s “The Tragedy of the Commons,” that considers the norm of the public realm to be individualistic and self-serving, therefor the commons is an unrealistic ideal that cannot come to full fruition or the opinions of Jane Jacobs who states her theories that the public sphere is only minimally social in nature. (Varnelis, 2012, Pg. 45). The conclusion that I am able to most relate to is … ” persistent predictions of imminent doom for established content industries, together with fears of corporate litigation and monopolistic forces squelching the emerging common culture, indicate that the future of public culture is still very much up for grabs” (Varnelis, 2012, Pg. 49). Therefore, the uncertainty and various possible future outcomes that exist as institutional and professional authorities are challenged by networked participation in the social, cultural and political realms. One example of this is the fact that P2P and creative commons sharing “…is new legislation by existing media conglomerates aiming to extend the scope of their copyright and prevent the creation of derivative work” (Varnelis, 2012, Pg. 158). It seems only through active participation can we take an active role in determining the final outcome.

References
Varnelis, K. (2012). Networked Publics. Cambridge, US: The MIT Press. Retrieved from http://www.ebrary.com.library.esc.edu

Educating Youth Via Video

At the Empire State College All College Conference I was fortunate to take the seminar, “Getting to Project Completion”. I was inspired by these concepts and how they aligned with my educational goals to teach project based or goal orientated learning. For adults the concepts and steps that must be learned can be more easily processed when presented via text or lecture than if presented in the same means to a young child.

I also took the Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) test in preparation for the seminar “Understanding your personality and how to work with others” Personality types is beneficial to understand when trying to reach a specific learner. Extroversion, introversion, sensing, intuition, thinking, feeling, judging, or perception concerning learning styles can easily be misinterpreted or seen as one being less desirable than the other. In the seminar we were inspired to see the knowledge of personality, or in this application, learning styles, as a tool in development and improvement.

I can imagine my daughter attending the seminar, distracted and unimpressed. Even with encouragement she would not have been able to absorb or retain the information presented. For young children this concept is much more complex and they do not have the prior learning or experience to help reinforce their understanding of these concepts. Finding visual ways to assist in elementary learning has been a studied and proven technique that improves the success rate in the retention of the knowledge presented. Finding ways to connect this knowledge to a child’s experiences and reinforce the learning through repetition to establish long term memory and retention of learning.

Understanding how short term memory evolves into long term memory is beneficial in designing repeated concepts that reinforce effective learning. To transition a new concept into learning the learning module can attach the new knowledge to what is already known creating associations. Through the process of repeat associations and stimulus through sensory registers long term memory is accessed and expanded on

In designing learning modules for youth, in addition to declarative knowledge, which can be accomplished through basic patterns and concepts such as math, procedural knowledge will help the student learn how to apply knowledge to specific tasks. Creating a teaching module that focuses on how to create a goal, for example and how to achieve that goal is project based learning.

Visual learning is considered the most effective means of learning and creating video presentations helps connect the visual with the verbal sensory inputs. Studies have been done with elementary level learners and can be used to help even young learners self-regulate. The video can go through several basic examples using everyday activities as the goal example.  The example video, rather than simply creating a lecture video is a proven successful tool in fostering an open learning environment. Incorporating incentives was also seen as a productive means to reinforce open education.

The learning module can be most effective when it takes the new concepts and connects them to concepts already learned. Creating a goal for a project involves many steps; thinking about why the project is important, helping the learner consider why they should care about the project, what steps are needed to complete the project, and what the project will accomplish.

For younger students to get them used to the new cognitive process of the steps needed for project planning and completion we can engage sensory registers and reinforce the new concept. This new concept begins as a short term memory item. By connecting the abstract concepts of setting a goal to concrete examples we connect the new concept to long term memory associations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

Fößl, T. t., Ebner, M. m., Schön, S. s., & Holzinger, A. a. (2016). A Field Study of a Video Supported Seamless-Learning-Setting with Elementary Learners. Journal Of Educational Technology & Society, 19(1), 321-336.

ÖZDEMIR, M. m., & YILDIZ, A. a. (2015). THE EFFECT OF EDUCATIONAL VIDEOS PRESENTED IN TWO DIFFERENT CONTENT STREAM ON MOTIVATION AND ACHIEVEMENT OF STUDENTS WITH VISUAL LEARNING STYLES. (English). Journal Of Theory & Practice In Education (JTPE), 11(1), 104-124.

Sultana, N., Kubra, B., & Khan, U. A. (2015). EFFECT OF VISUAL STYLE-BASED INSTRUCTION ON LEARNERS’ ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AT ELEMENTARY LEVEL. Gomal University Journal Of Research, 31(2), 146-155.

New Guidelines for Screen time for Children from the American Academy of Pediatrics

Thoughts on the exploration, learning and application of emerging technologies in homeschooling.

 

  • The learning environment that I am creating, will be a front door access point creating an overall environment that will be welcoming and engaging for my student(s). It will allow choices and self guided as well as guided activities. This environment will map the expectations in the formulation of achievable goals and motivational rewards through participation in virtual environments.
  • Traditional “learning”  in a conventional sense for youth is paper based, reading, writing, question/answer responses, drills, and memorization of subject matter that is detached from its actual real life application. I would like to bring to my students and to other parents interested in homeschooling, an awareness of how emerging technologies can enrich the learning experience and help achieve future student success in the real world of higher education, employment, or life goals.
  • Personal learning challenges in this endeavor will be finding or creating free or inexpensive resources and learning the aspects of each of these tools to accomplish the goals. Another challenge will be in educating other adults within my network to the process involved as well as the reasoning behind the methodologies I am incorporating.

Teaching art is more than just technique

It is Creativity, Community, and Caring… and so much more

This presentation is an example of how you can make the most out of what you do. I am the art teacher in this presentation. The memories I created and the lessons learned in the minds of the children I taught live on, however through new media and new literacies  technology was used to expand the message. Take the gifts that you have been given to share with the world and use the resource the world has given you to bring them to their fullest potential.